Which is The Best Gaggia Coffee Machine For You?

Gaggia coffee machines have been around for quite some time, in fact Gaggia invented coffee machines as we know them. So before I start talking about the best Gaggia coffee machines, let’s very quickly dive into the history of the famous coffee machine brand.

Guy with Coffee Disgusted
If you need a coffee alternative that can give you energy, check this link: Club Early Bird Morning Cocktail. They have a discont coupon wayting for you.

The first espresso machines were developed in the early 1800s, but it was Milan cafe’ owner Achille Gaggia’s who invented what we now know as espresso, with the “steam-free coffee machine” which he filed his patent for in 1938. 

Achille Gaggia.
The guy stood on the right, next to the espresso machine is Achille Gaggia.

With this came the “crema” we associate with espresso, which wasn’t something present with espresso created under much lower steam pressure of the earlier espresso machines. So Gaggia didn’t just invent the first modern espresso machine, they invented what we now know as espresso, too.

Here’s a little fun fact for you re Crema. While this now something largely revered by coffee lovers, that’s down to clever marketing – and this beloved foam on the top of espresso we now know as crema, was once referred to as “coffee scum” and thought of as potentially a downside to this higher pressure extraction. 

Crema on Espresso.
Crema on Espresso. Photo Credit: Di Bella Coffee

This was until Mr. Gaggia cleverly flipped that into a positive, and coined the phrase “Crema” which was marketed as a positive byproduct of this new (at the time) espresso-making technology.

History lesson over ;-), let’s get on with it. 

A quick note about Gaggia Direct

When it comes to Gaggia coffee machines, I always recommend Gaggia Direct.

These are the folk who were actually Gaggia UK back in the day, before Philips bought the company which owned Gaggia (Saeco), and subsequently closed down Gaggia UK. The then MD of Gaggia UK, Raj Beadle, in a bid to keep everyone in jobs, took over and formed what is now known as Gaggia Direct, who became the UK official distributor for Gaggia Milan.

Gaggia Direct Offices.
Gaggia Direct Offices in Elland, Near Halifax.

The reason I always recommend Gaggia Direct when I’m talking about Gaggia machines, is that I genuinely believe these are the best people in the UK to buy the machines from. They stock the machines here in the UK, you can simply call them if you have a problem, and they have engineers in-house to fix any problems which occur. 

I’ve spent time at their building in Elland near Halifax, I’ve seen and heard them interacting with new and existing customers, and I’ve also had a lot of feedback from fellow coffee botherers who are customers of theirs, and as a result I’m always very comfortable to recommend them.

Some of the other options for buying Gaggia machines (and you can usually tell by the price, as they tend to be a bit cheaper) appear to be UK based companies but are actually “grey importing” machines directly from Italy or from other parts of Europe.

There can be a few issues with this, including the fact that the price can be misleading as it won’t include the import duty and VAT that you’ll end up paying to the courier, but the main issue for me is the warranty.

If you buy a Gaggia machine which comes in from outside of the UK, you won’t have a UK warranty, so it’ll mean sending it back to Italy or wherever it came from, at your cost. Getting other after-sales support is also likely to be less simple than with Gaggia Direct who you can simply phone on a UK landline, or have a zoom call with.

Best Gaggia Coffee Machines

If you’ve decided you want to invest in a Gaggia coffee machine, the obvious next question is which is the best Gaggia coffee machine?

The simple answer to this is that there isn’t a best machine overall, but there will be a best Gaggia coffee machine for you, and hopefully, you’ll have a much better idea of which one that is by the time you’re done reading this post. 

Before we continue, though, just a very quick conversation about the types of coffee machine.

Gaggia coffee machines are all espresso machines, but espresso machines can be split into two main streams: 

Bean to cup coffee machines & Traditional espresso machines.

Bean to cup coffee machines are espresso machines with integrated grinders, and are designed to handle nearly all of the process for you. To a large degree, the user just presses a button and the machine handles the rest. 

Which kind of bean to cup coffee machine you go for would determine just how much of a one touch process it is, as bean to cup coffee machines are split into two categories too:

Standard bean to cup machines & One touch bean to cup machines.

Standard bean to cup machines are also known as semi automatic, or “one touch coffee” machines, and these handle the coffee side of things at the touch of a button, and have a steam wand for the user to steam the milk.

One touch machines also known as one touch milk coffee machines or cappuccino makers, handle both the coffee and the milk at the touch of a button.

Traditional espresso machines can actually be split into a few categories. Most espresso machines on the market these days are known as semi automatic traditional espresso machines, or “pump espresso machines”, and these kind of machines create the pressure via a pump, vs the fully manual espresso machines where a lever is pulled to activate a piston which creates the pressure.

This fully manual machine is what Gaggia initially created, and for years Baristas could be seen pulling Levers, in fact this is why it’s referred to as “pulling” a shot of espresso. Fully manual machines are still around, such as the La Pavoni Europiccola. I’ve got one, although I don’t use it often these days, mainly I like looking at it, they’re a thing of beauty.

But most people tend to go with semi automatic machines, where a button is simply pressed to set the pump going to push the water at pressure through the ground coffee.

Semi automatic espresso machines are then split into two categories too, well – three if you also count commercial espresso machines, but we’re talking about home coffee machines here. 

Home Barista espresso machines vs Domestic Espresso Machines

Home barista espresso machines, also known as prosumer espresso machines, are basically commercial-grade espresso machines made for home use. Although they’re made smaller, and (most of the time, but not always) cheaper, they use the same technology as commercial machines – to pull shots of espresso at 9 bars of pressure via standard filter baskets. 

Home barista machines aren’t coffee machines that the everyday “normal” coffee drinker can just take out of the box and start making great coffee at the touch of a button.  You’d need a grinder too, one which is capable of grinding for espresso, which the cheapest grinders usually aren’t. More importantly, you’d need home barista skills, and these take time and effort to hone.

Being a home barista is a hobby, rather than just means to an end, it requires the investment of time, effort & money, and I see being a home barista as a continual process of development, with most of us home baristas continually working on improving their craft.

Domestic espresso machines also known as consumer espresso machines or simply as “cheap espresso machines” are made more for the “every day” coffee drinker, someone who just wants to spend a relatively small amount of money on a coffee machine, take it out of the box and start making coffee that they’re happy with, straight away with little or no learnging curve. 

These kind of machines are made to work with pre-ground coffee beans or with cheaper grinders which wouldn’t be capable of grinding for espresso with a home barista espresso machine, and they create espresso in a slightly different way than traditional commercial and prosumer or home barista espresso machines.

They look similar, although they’re usually smaller – and they use pumps, portafilters, filter baskets etc., but they’re all a bit different. 

The pumps for example are usually 15 bar pumps, which means the coffee is extracted under much higher pressure than the traditional 9 bars. They nearly always use what is known as a pressurised filter basket, and they nearly always use thermoblock boilers when it comes to most brands, however with Gaggia machines – all bar one of their domestic machines use a proper brew boiler and not a thermoblock. I’ll explain this in more detail a bit later in this post.

Filter baskets are the round metal baskets in the portafilter (filter holder) which the ground coffee goes into and is tamped down prior to being locked into the group so the shot can be pulled. 

On commercial and home barista machines, these contain lots of holes, and the coffee has to be ground much finer than with most other coffee brewing methods, and also much more precisely, with each espresso machine requiring a different grind size with each different coffee bean, this involves a process known as “dialling in”, where we keep altering the grind size until we reach the sweet spot. 

Some time ago when trying to make cheaper and more accessible espresso machines, Gaggia invented what they call their “perfect crema” basket.

This basket instead of being full of holes, has just one hole in the outer part of the basket, through which the coffee is forced, under the high pressure that has built up in the basket, in order to create the same kind of crema (or at least something which looks the same) that is created with a more traditional espresso machine.

This kind of basket was picked up by other manufacturers of domestic espresso machines, and is now generally regarded to as the pressurised basket or pressured basket. What it does, really, is allows these cheaper machines to mimic the crema you’d get with a perfectly pulled shot of espresso with a commercial or prosumer/home barista espresso machine.

What these kind of baskets don’t offer, though, is the control over the extraction to enable you to make a great tasting shot of espresso. They can make espresso look the part, but they can’t quite make it taste the part. I have to say, though, if you’re using decent coffee beans – and especially if you’re grinding your own – they’re capable of not bad tasting espresso, which most “normal” coffee drinkers would be more than happy with.

So, given the price tag of these kinds of machines, usually under £200, and given the fact that you don’t need to develop home barista skills and you don’t need to spend time dialling in as you would with commercial or home barista espresso machines, I do have to give these kinds of machines their due.

Gaggia produce all of the above types of coffee machines, so I’m going to split their machines up into the various categories, to make it easier for you to dive straight into the most appropriate type of coffee machine for you.

Best Gaggia semi automatic bean to cup coffee machines

Before I carry on, I’m just going to quickly list the features which are present in all of the Gaggia bean to cup coffee machines. Instead of adding these features to every product, these features are present on all of the Gaggia bean to cup coffee machines, so I thought it would make sense to list these together:

Ceramic Burrs

All of the Gaggia bean to cup machines have ceramic burrs to grind the coffee. This isn’t the industry standard, most electric burr grinders use stainless steel burrs, but this is something Gaggia has stuck by since they began making bean to cup machines, and their stance is that ceramic burrs don’t heat the coffee beans in the same way that stainless steel burrs do. 

Removable Brew Unit

The brewing unit on all of the Gaggia bean to cup coffee machines is a single unit which simply pulls out to be rinsed under the tap and put back into the machine. 

Automatic Dose Adjustment 

This is actually a really clever feature that Gaggia don’t talk that much about in a lot of their blurb. The Gaggia bean to cup machines have an inbuilt mechanism that allows them to detect the pressure required to auto tamp the coffee prior to pulling the shot, and the machines learn from this and apply this to the next shot. 

Dregs Drawer Full Indication

The used pucks of coffee are expelled internally into what’s known as the dregs drawer, and each machine will only allow a certain number of shots to be pulled before indicating that you need to empty it. The machine won’t let you make another coffee until you’ve emptied it.

Cleaning & Descaling Alerts

All of the Gaggia bean to cup coffee machines will flash at you to let you know when you need to do things such as cleaning and descaling, and some of the more premium machines allow you to select your water hardness so that it can prompt you to descale at a schedule which is appropriate.

Gaggia Besana Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Besana Coffee Machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features:

  • 1 Litre Water Tank
  • 180g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Panarello steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • 5 grind settings
  • Dimensions: 29.5cm wide x 42cm deep x 32.5cm tall
  • Simple espresso memory: Re-set volumes by simply pressing and holding the espresso or lungo button.
  • Maximum Cup Height: 9.8 cm
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 8

My Observations

This is an interesting looking little bean to cup machine from Gaggia, at first glance it resembles something like an air fryer or deep fat fryer than it does a coffee machine ;-). A coffee machine though it certainly is, and a very inexpensive one, too.

Philips (who own Gaggia) used to sell this same machine under the name “Philips 2100” – but it seems they decided to move it over to the Gaggia brand.

This is the lowest-priced bean to cup coffee machine from Gaggia at present, and right now it’s available for just £299 from Gaggia Direct. 

The only negative I sometimes read about this machine is that it was previously a Philips model so it’s not really a Gaggia, but I disagree with that, I think it’s actually the other way around.

This machine is clearly a Gaggia machine, when you look at the internals. With the removable brew group &  ceramic burrs, I’d say this is a Gaggia coffee machine which was at some point also sold under the Philips brand, rather than vice versa.

It has the same 5 grind settings as the Brera, the same removable brew group, a similar (albeit smaller) front-loading water tank, and it’s a very simple machine to use.

See also  CBD Coffee Wants to Give You a Life While Mellowing You Out - Phoenix New Times

It doesn’t have a grinder bypass for pre-ground coffee beans as the Brera and other Gaggia bean to cup coffee machines have, and it doesn’t have multiple strength settings either, which are the main features that separate this machine from the slightly more expensive Gaggia bean to cup coffee machines.

This machine simply has two buttons, and you can very simply (pressing and holding) re-set them, so you can have one as your espresso, and one as your lungo for example.

The downside is that you can’t change the amount of coffee ground, which is 10 grams.  So you could set the single shot button to a 1:2 ratio, 10 grams of ground coffee to 20ml of espresso, and set the other to a one to three, for example, to 30ml (via brew scales, or a measured glass). But if you wanted a double shot, for instance 20 grams of ground coffee to 40 ml of espresso, you’d need to pull two shots.

Although overall I’m quite impressed with this little machine, it has competition in the form of the De’Longhi Magnifica ESAM 4200, which is usually available slightly cheaper. It has more grind settings, strength settings, a much bigger water tank, and overall I think it’s a lot more machine for slightly less cash. For more see:

De'Longhi ESAM 4200 Review

Gaggia Naviglio Bean to cup coffee machine

Gaggia Naviglio Bean to cup coffee machine

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features:

  • 1.5 Litre Water Tank
  • 300g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Panarello steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • 5 grind settings
  • Dimensions: 25.6cm wide x 44cm deep x 34cm tall 
  • Programmable Espresso and Lungo Buttons
  • 3 strengths settings
  • Maximum Cup Height: 11.5 cm
  • Double shot capability
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 10

My Observations

OK so now we’re looking at a coffee machine that actually looks like a coffee machine ;-). The Naviglio from Gaggia is fairly minimalist in its design, and it’s a very simple coffee machine to use.

It differs from the Besana in a few obvious ways. It has a much bigger 1.8L water tank, a bigger bean hopper, it has three strength settings (7g, 9g, 11g), and it has the ability to pull double shots.

You can pull a double shot with the Besana, but only by pressing the button twice. With the Naviglio, you can set it to pull a double shot. It doesn’t do it by grinding double the amount of coffee and then pulling the shot in one, it grinds and pulls a single shot and then does it again, so not really a huge amount of difference to using the Besana really in this regard, it’s just that you don’t have to press the button twice.

Being able to decide on the strength of your coffee from the standard single shot of 7g, up to 11g I do think is a good feature, and it’s very simple to toggle between these three by simply turning the dial to either 1 bean (7g), 2 bean (9g) or 3 bean (11g).

The hopper size thing – personally I wouldn’t recommend filling the hopper anyway. I’d recommend keeping your coffee beans in an airtight container, and just put what you’re about to use into the hopper, as beans will go stale much quicker in a hopper than they will when stored in an airtight container.

By the way, it’s fine to freeze coffee beans, this is something I’m commonly asked. The only issue with freezing is if you freeze the full bag and keep getting that bag out, as the constant changes in temp can damage the beans. If you’re going to freeze them I’d separate them into smaller amounts, and then take out one smaller bag at a time to be used that day or the next day for example.

I’d recommend taking them out of the freezer the night before too, grinding frozen beans probably isn’t the best idea for more than one reason.

The Naviglio doesn’t have a bypass chute for pre-ground coffee, by the way, something it shares with the Besana. This won’t be an issue for most people, but some people like to keep a bag of pre-ground decaf and for that reason need a bypass chute.

Personally, I’d recommend keeping decaf coffee beans wholebean in an airtight container, and not filling the hopper. This way if you need to make a decaf, just chuck in what you think will be enough for the coffee you’re about to make (or weigh the beans before putting them in the hopper). Pre-gound beand go stale far quicker than wholebean, because so much more of the surface area of the coffee is exposed to the air.

Price-wise, usually at £350 with 2 year warranty or £360 with 3 years, again it does have competition, mainly in the form of the De’Longhi Magnifica S Ecam E22 which usually sells for around the same price as the Naviglio. They’re quite closely matched machines I think, but just being completely honest, I prefer the look of the Naviglio over the Magnifica, and generally speaking, I’d buy Gaggia over De’Longhi for how easy it is to get great, personable support from Gaggia Direct.

Best Bean to Cup Coffee Machine? Gaggia Brera.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

 

Features.

  • 1.2 Litre Water Tank
  • 250g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Panarello steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • 5 grind settings
  • Dimensions: 25.6cm wide x 42.5cm deep x 33cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Maximum Cup Height: 12 cm
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 8

My Review

My Observations:

I used the Brera as my coffee machine at home for a few weeks in the leadup to writing my Gaggia Brera reveiew, and overall I found it to be a really good, compact bean to cup coffee machine, for the price.

There’s not a great deal that I can really say negative about it, the only thing I would say is that there are a couple of compromises of making this such a compact machine, such as drip tray size, water tank size and hopper size, although hopper size doesn’t bother me as I’d never fill up a hopper, I’d always keep my beans in the bag or an airtight container and just weigh the beans I’m about to use. 

So all I would say on this basis is that if you don’t need the compact size, there are other Gaggia bean to cup coffee machines that aren’t quite as compact which have bigger water tanks and other features, for a similar price. The obvious being the base level Anima which I’ll talk about shortly.

The Anima has a bigger water tank, with a top fill which allows you to top up the water as you’re pulling a shot if you’re about to run out. It has 5 strength settings vs 3, and it’ll let you input your water hardness so it knows how many shots to let you pull in between reminding you to descale.

Also, right now (mid June 2021) the Brera has been out of stock for some time in the UK, and whenever they come in they’re usually spoken for with backorders, so to get hold of one requires some waiting.

But, they have stock of the Anima, so for a limited period (while stocks remain, which I’m thinking will be for the next couple of weeks) they’re giving my fellow coffee botherers (my term for coffee blog readers) a discount code offering £50 off the Anima.

The Anima is usually £499 – but until the end of June, they’re offering a discount code to coffee blog readers, of £50 – which means the Anima is £449, just £24 more than the Brera. Also, they’re currently giving a 3 year warranty on the Anima instead of the standard 2 year warranty! 

This discount code is COFBL0621  – just click here, add the Anima to your bag, and at checkout click “redeem coupon” and paste in the code. If it doesn’t work just make sure you’ve not accidentally copied and pasted a space.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 1.5 Litre Water Tank
  • 300g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Panarello steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • 10 grind settings
  • Dimensions: 25.6cm wide x 44cm deep x 34cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 11.5 cm
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 8

My Observations:

One of the relatively new coffee machines from Sage, the Velasca series has double the grind settings compared to the other machines we’ve covered so far, 10 settings vs 5.

While I do think it’s a case of the more the merrier with grind adjustments, I have to be honest and say that it probably isn’t going to make a huge difference re the 5 settings vs 10.

Firstly, most bean to cup machine users aren’t going to do much with the grind settings anyway, I know from speaking to people who use bean to cup coffee machines that most people just leave it at whatever it was factory set to, and never change it. 

I would recommend all bean to cup coffee machine users experiment with the grind size, and I think most people will find that adjusting to the finest setting will usually produce the best results with most bean to cup machines. But if you’re the kind of person who is going to spend time doing what’s known as “dialling in” meaning to keep tweakking the grind setting until you get the perfect extraction, you wouldn’t be looking at bean to cup, you’d be looking at the semi automatic manual espresso machines that I’ll be talking about shortly.

In a nutshell, I’d say that this is a machine which has a similar compact footprint to the Brera and the Naviglio, but while bringing more in terms of features, with more grind settings & more strength settings.

Gaggia anima bean to cup espresso machine.

Gaggia anima bean to cup espresso machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 1.8 Litre Water Tank
  • Top filling water tank for uninterrupted shots
  • 250g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Panarello steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • 5 grind settings
  • 5 strength settings
  • Dimensions: 22.1cm wide x 43cm deep x 34cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 15 cm
  • Ability to program descale frequency based on water hardness
  • Adjustable brew temperature
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 16

My Observations:

The Anima is one of the bean to cup machines from Gaggia that I think really hits the sweet spot when it comes to price point vs features.

Yes, it’s a little bit more expensive than some of the other more entry level options, but just look at some of the features. 

It has a bigger water tank than most, and a bigger waste coffee drawer capacity than most of the others, too – which means filling the water tank and emptying the wast coffee container less. 

It has the ability to top up the water if you notice you’re close to running out mid-shot, which is a handy feature – and being able to input your water hardness is another handy feature, as it means the frequency of the descale reminders will be appropriate for the water hardness in your area. You can also adjust the brew temperature on the Anima, which is a feature you don’t often see on coffee machines at this kind of price point.

As I mentioned earlier while talking about the Brera, there’s currently (and I think it’ll last until the end of June 2021 providing stock lasts that long) a £50 off discount code for coffee blog readers purely for the Anima.  To save you scrolling up, here’s the code again: COFBL0621  – click here, add the Anima to your bag, and at checkout click “redeem coupon” and paste in the code. 

Gaggia Magenta Plus Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Magenta Plus Coffee Machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 1.8 Litre Water Tank
  • Top filling water tank for uninterrupted shots
  • 250g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Panarello steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • 5 grind settings
  • 5 strength settings
  • 4 fully customisable touch button coffee selections
  • Very simple memory option – you’re asked every time you make a change if you’d like to save the changes to that coffee
  • Full colour user interface
  • Hot water option for Tea
  • Dimensions: 22.4cm wide x 43.5cm deep x 35.7cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 15.5 cm
  • Ability to program descale frequency based on water hardness
  • One Touch Americano
  • Adjustable brew temperature
  • Double cup selection prompts double grind, not two cups from the same amount of ground coffee
  • Professional Steam Wand
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 15

My Observations:

As I said in my best bean to cup coffee machines post, if I were going to use a bean to cup coffee machine, it would probably be the Gaggia Magenta plus, mainly due to the pro steam wand.

This machine has a lot more going for it than this single feature, but to have a pro wand on a bean to cup coffee machine is almost unheard of, so this is what makes this machine particularly special. 

If you’re not a fan of milkies (latte, cappuccino, flat white etc.) then this won’t make any difference to you – but if you are, I’d consider the Magento plus if I were you. All of the other semi automatic bean to cup machines from Sage come with panarello steam wands, which are fine if you want the thicker spoonable foam for what I refer to as “old school cappuccino” – a lot of people love that kind of milk texture.

I’m a bit more third wave in this regard, for me, the milk texture needs to be velvety and smooth, which means microfoam – and panarello steam wands don’t do microfoam. One touch fully automatic bean to cup coffee machines don’t to microfoam, either, they produce a similar thick foam to panarello wands.

Usually if I’m using a bean to cup machine for review purposes, I’ll pull off the panarello and use the steam pipe underneath as a pro steam wand, which is fine, it’s doable with some practice, but it’s not quite as good as using a proper steam wand, and you don’t usually quite have the length you need to get into the milk jug, so it can be a bit of a faff doing it that way.  So, this would be the bean to cup machine I’d go for if I wanted to go down this route. 

Just to quickly add – if price wasn’t an option, I’d probably go for the Sage Oracle or Sage Oracle Touch if I were going bean to cup, these have pro steam wands which also automatically create the microfoam for you, and they’re amazing – but they’re also around three to four times the price of the Magenta Plus, which puts it out of most people’s budgets.

It’s not just about the pro steam wand, though, as I said – aside from that, it’s still a really impressive machine. The simple one touch coffee selection not just for espresso and lungo but for Americano too, and the fact that you have a really simple “do you want to save the new setting” every time you’ve made a change, I think are really good features for a machine at this price point to have, and there are loads of other features too, many of which are shared with the Anima.

See also  How To Counteract Caffeine When You’ve Had One Coffee Too Many

Overall, taking everything into consideration including the pro steam wand, I think the Magenta Plus is a difficult machine to beat, at this kind of price point.

Gaggia cadorna coffee machine.

Gaggia cadorna coffee machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 1.5 Litre Water Tank
  • 300g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Panarello steam wand
  • 4 drinks profiles
  • Favoutites button
  • Ristretto option
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • 10 grind settings
  • 5 strength settings
  • 5 fully customisable touch button coffee selections
  • Full colour user interface
  • Hot water option for Tea
  • Dimensions: 26cm wide x 38cm deep x 44cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 15 cm
  • Ability to program descale frequency based on water hardness
  • One Touch Americano
  • Adjustable brew temperature
  • Double cup selection prompts double grind, not two cups from the same amount of ground coffee
  • Professional Steam Wand
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 10

My Observations:

As you can see by now, Gaggia have quite a range of machines – and I have to admit that at times, I’m struggling to fully understand why they released a new machine in terms of features being similar to machine they already make. With the Cadorna though, I can see why they’ve come up with this range and who they’re aiming it at. 

What they’ve made here is a range of coffee machines (I say a range, as they do fully automatic one-touch versions too which I’ll discuss next) with shared use in mind. They’ve made a machine which up to four people can set and fully customize their very own drinks. So if there are going to be up to four family members or flatmates, or whatever the case may be, using this machine – each can have their own separate user profile.

As with the Magenta range, the coffees are really simple to change when it comes to strength, volume & temperature, and it’s really simple to save each setting to your own profile. 

I think it’s a really clever feature, my only criticism is that as each profile simply has a colour, and there’s no profile password protection or anything like that, it would be quite simple for someone to accidentally change the settings on the wrong profile, and I can see that being a bit frustrating, potentially causing some family rows ;-).

There is another version of this which has the pro steam wand, the Cadorna Barista Plus, but that version isn’t currently available in the UK, which I think is a shame, as that has nearly all of the features of the Magenta plus including the pro steam wand plus the four user profiles and the ristretto option.

This is an interesting option by the way, it’s not all that common to find a bean to cup machine with a ristretto option.   A ristretto, in case you weren’t aware, is a more concentrated shot, with a higher ratio of coffee to water than a standard espresso.

Using a ristretto for milkies does change the taste, so having a ristretto option is a great thing, in my opinion, when it comes to allowing people to tune in their perfect milkies.

For example you might find that you prefer a flat white made with a double ristretto over one made with a double espresso – some baristas insist that it should be ristretto, but flat white is a hugely contentious drink, no one seems to be able to agree on exactly what it is and what its origins are ;-).  I say it’s whatever you want it to be, so if you go for this machine, try it with ristretto and with espresso, see which you prefer.

Best Gaggia one touch bean to cup coffee machines

If you’ve already read through all of the semi-automatic bean to cup machines, above, you’ll notice that we’re talking about (mostly) the same machines, but with the fully automatic or “one touch cappuccino maker” versions – as most of the bean to cup machines from Gaggia come as a range including semi auto and fully auto via two options. 

These two options are the cappuccinatore option (usually these versions are referred to simply as either “deluxe” or “milk”, and the carafe versions which are usually referred to as either “prestige” or “one touch”.

The cappuccinatore is essentially the milk frother part of the carafe on the fully automatic or “one touch” bean to cup machines, but instead of having a milk carafe that slots into the machine, you just have the frother part, and the tube goes into your milk jug or milk bottle. 

Gaggia Naviglio Deluxe Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Naviglio Deluxe Coffee Machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features:

(Those which differ from the base level version above in bold) 

  • 1.5 Litre Water Tank
  • 300g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Cappuccinatore milk frother
  • Hot water dispensed via steam pipe (by removing cappuccinatore)
  • 5 grind settings
  • Dimensions: 25.6cm wide x 44cm deep x 34cm tall 
  • Programmable Espresso and Lungo Buttons
  • 3 strengths settings
  • Maximum Cup Height: 11.5 cm
  • Double shot capability
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 10

My Observations

This is the same as the Naviglio, above – but it features the cappuccinatore for auto milk frothing. Instead of the user needing to steam the milk and then pour the milk into the cup, you just move the cup under the cappuccinatore and press the button, after putting the milk pipe into your bottle of milk.

Gaggia Naviglio Milk

Gaggia Naviglio Milk

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features:

(Those which differ from the base level version above in bold) 

  • 1.5 Litre Water Tank
  • 300g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Cyclonic chamber cappuccinatore milk frother
  • Milk delivered directly into cup – no need to move the cup
  • Hot water dispensed via steam pipe (by removing cappuccinatore)
  • 5 grind settings
  • Dimensions: 25.6cm wide x 44cm deep x 34cm tall 
  • Programmable Espresso and Lungo Buttons
  • 3 strengths settings
  • Maximum Cup Height: 11.5 cm
  • Double shot capability
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 10

My Observations

This is a newer one touch version of the Naviglio, with an improved cappuccinatore system which they’ve given the catchy title “cyclonic chamber”.  Also, this is one of the cappuccinatore frothers from Gaggia which features the “milk slide” which directs the milk directly into your cup sitting on the drip tray, meaning you don’t have to move the cup, so it makes it slightly more convenient.

Gaggia Anima Deluxe Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Anima Deluxe Coffee Machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

(Those which differ from the base level version above in bold) 

  • 1.8 Litre Water Tank
  • Top filling water tank for uninterrupted shots
  • 250g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Cappuccinatore milk frother
  • Hot water dispensed via steam pipe (by removing cappuccinatore)
  • 5 grind settings
  • 5 strength settings
  • Dimensions: 22.1cm wide x 43cm deep x 34cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 15 cm
  • Ability to program descale frequency based on water hardness
  • Adjustable brew temperature
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 16

My Observations:

The Anima Deluxe has all of the features of the base level semi-auto anima, but with the cappuccinatore to handle the milk for you instead of the steam wand.

Gaggia Anima Class One Touch Coffee Machine

Gaggia Anima Class One Touch Coffee Machine

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

(Those which differ from the base level version above in bold) 

  • 1.8 Litre Water Tank
  • Top filling water tank for uninterrupted shots
  • 250g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Carafe milk frother
  • One Touch Cappuccino
  • One Touch Latte Macchiato
  • Hot water spout interchangeable with carafe
  • 5 grind settings
  • 5 strength settings
  • Dimensions: 22.1cm wide x 43cm deep x 34cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 15 cm
  • Ability to program descale frequency based on water hardness
  • Adjustable brew temperature
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 16

My Observations:

This is the base level one-touch milk carafe version of the Anima, with a milk carafe to handle the milk. So instead of a steam wand or a cappuccinatore to deliver the milk, you put the milk in the carafe, slot this in, and the milk is taken from the carafe, frothed, and dispensed into your cup/glass. When I say “base level” – basically the body is all plastic on the Anima Class, while you get a brushed stainless steel front and top with the Anima Prestige, below.

Gaggia Anima Prestige One Touch Coffee Machine

Gaggia Anima Prestige One Touch Coffee Machine

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

All as per Class One Touch above.

My Observations:

This is the same machine as the slightly cheaper Anima Class, above, but it has a stainless steel front and top – so it looks and feels a bit more luxurious.

Gaggia Magenta Milk.

Gaggia Magenta Milk.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

(Those which differ from the base level version above in bold) 

  • 1.8 Litre Water Tank
  • Top filling water tank for uninterrupted shots
  • 250g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Cappuccinatore milk frother
  • One Touch Cappuccino
  • Hot water dispensed via steam pipe (by removing cappuccinatore)
  • 5 grind settings
  • 5 strength settings
  • 4 fully customisable touch button coffee selections
  • Very simple memory option – you’re asked every time you make a change if you’d like to save the changes to that coffee
  • Full colour user interface
  • Hot water option for Tea
  • Dimensions: 22.4cm wide x 43.5cm deep x 35.7cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 15.5 cm
  • Ability to program descale frequency based on water hardness
  • One Touch Americano
  • Adjustable brew temperature
  • Double cup selection prompts double grind, not two cups from the same amount of ground coffee
  • Professional Steam Wand
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 15

My Observations:

This is the cappuccinatore version of the Magenta, but unlike some of the cappuccinatore versions this one is a one touch coffee machine exactly as per the prestige carafe version below, the only difference being that the milk is drawn via the pipe from your milk bottle or milk jug, instead of from the carafe. 

This machine actually comes with a milk container, too, so it’s not actually a great deal different to the prestige version really, the only real difference is that the milk sits next to the machine and is drawn up via the pipe, rather than this all being done in one self-contained unit.

Gaggia Magenta Prestige Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Magenta Prestige Coffee Machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

All as per Magenta Milk, above, except:

  • Carafe milk frother
  • Hot water spout interchangeable with carafe

My Observations:

There’s not a great deal to say here, this is simply the carafe version of the Magenta. The features are the same as the slightly cheaper “milk” version, above, the only difference is that the milk goes in the carafe which slots onto the machine, and the frothing is handled in the carafe, so it looks a bit neater than with the cappuccinatore version, that’s about it.

Gaggia Velasca Prestige Espresso Machine.

Gaggia Velasca Prestige Espresso Machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

(Those which differ from the base level version above in bold) 

  • 1.5 Litre Water Tank
  • 300g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Carafe milk frother
  • One Touch Cappuccino
  • One Touch Latte Macchiato
  • Hot water spout interchangeable with carafe
  • Carafe quick clean button
  • Rubber seal on hopper lid for improved freshness
  • Special drinks button (for dispensing water and small cappuccino)
  • 10 grind settings
  • Dimensions: 25.6cm wide x 44cm deep x 34cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 11.5 cm
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 8

My Observations:

There are only two versions of the Velasca, the standard semi-auto version, and the prestige milk carafe version. This version features a quick clean button for cleaning the carafe, which is a handy thing to have on a one-touch machine with a milk carafe, as you do need to keep on top of the cleaning.

It also has a “special drinks” button which features hot water (very special…) and what they refer to as “Baby Cappuccino” – which isn’t Babyccino by the way, this is an option simpy for a smaller cappuccino. I’m not sure why, but if you occasionally want a smaller cappuccino, you may find this useful.

There’s another difference with this machine which doesn’t concern the milk, which is unusual actually as the difference between the versions in each range is usually just down to milk – the hopper lid on the prestige has a rubber seal around the hopper lid. I’m not sure why all machines don’t have this, to be honest – not only for freshness (and as I’ve said, I wouldn’t recommend leaving beans in the hopper anyway), but because a rubber seal on the hopper lid does tend to dampen some of the grinding noise.

Gaggia Cadorna Milk Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Cadorna Milk Coffee Machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

(Those which differ from the base level version above in bold) 

  • 1.5 Litre Water Tank
  • 300g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Cappuccinatore milk frother
  • One Touch Cappuccino
  • One Touch Latte Macchiato
  • One Touch Café au lait
  • Hot water dispensed via steam pipe (by removing cappuccinatore)
  • 4 drinks profiles
  • Favoutites button
  • Ristretto option
  • 10 grind settings
  • 5 strength settings
  • 5 fully customisable touch button coffee selections
  • Full colour user interface
  • Hot water option for Tea
  • Dimensions: 26cm wide x 38cm deep x 44cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 15 cm
  • Ability to program descale frequency based on water hardness
  • One Touch Americano
  • Adjustable brew temperature
  • Double cup selection prompts double grind, not two cups from the same amount of ground coffee
  • Professional Steam Wand
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 10

My Observations:

As with the Magenta milk, the Cadorna milk is the cappuccinatore (or capp in cup as they’ve started to refer to these particular types of cappuccinatore as) version, but it’s a one touch coffee machine as the carafe version is.

It’s quite unusual to have a one touch bean to cup coffee machine with a café au lait selection, although whether the café au lait this machine delivers will be what you are expecting, depends on what you’re expecting, of course ;-). As with the flat white, if you ask a dozen baristas to describe exactly what this beverage is, you’ll get a dozen different answers.

Gaggia Cadorna Prestige Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Cadorna Prestige Coffee Machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

All as per Cadorna Milk, above, except:

  • Carafe milk frother
  • Hot water spout interchangeable with carafe
  • One touch flat white
  • One touch XL cappuccino 
  • One touch XL Latte Macchiato

My Observations:

While many of the features of the Cadorna prestige are shared with the Cadorna milk, as you’ll see above, there are some additional one-touch coffees with the Cadorna prestige. The biggie being the hugely popular flat white, although I have to say I’ve never had a flat white from any one touch bean to cup coffee machine that I thought was a true flat white. They’re similar, but generally speaking, the milk texture just isn’t quite right.

The prestige version also has options for an extra large cappuccino and an extra large latte macchiato. 

See also  How to Make Better Tasting Espresso at Home – Kev’s Guide.

Gaggia Bibila One Touch. Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Bibila One Touch. Coffee Machine.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 1.5 Litre Water Tank
  • Dual Boilers
  • Top filling water tank for uninterrupted shots
  • 250g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Carafe milk frother
  • Manual steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • One Touch Cappuccino
  • One Touch Latte Macchiato
  • Special drinks button for ristretto, flat white & espresso macchiato 
  • Self cleaning milk carafe
  • 15 grind settings
  • 5 strength settings
  • 3 taste settings – delicate, balanced, full-bodied
  • 3 brew temperature settings
  • Flow rate knob
  • Dimensions: 24.5cm wide x 42cm deep x 36cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 16.5 cm
  • Ability to program descale frequency based on water hardness
  • Adjustable brew temperature
  • Adjustable standby time
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 11

My Observations:

This is one of Gaggia’s two main flagship one touch bean to cup machines, and the second most expensive machine in the range in the UK at the time of writing.

While a lot of the other machines in the lineup are fairly similar when it comes to the coffee side of things, there’s really quite a jump here in terms of the features relating to the espresso-making.

First of all, this is a dual boiler coffee machine, meaning that there is a brew boiler and a steam boiler, and this is rare among home bean to cup machines. I’d expect dual boiler on a commercial bean to cup machine, which tend to be a few thousand and up, and which are made to service busy offices, canteens, restaurants and so on – but there aren’t many domestic dual boiler bean to cup coffee machines.

The only real noticeable benefit of the dual boiler aspect, though, will be if you’re steaming milk manually, as you’ll be able to do that while pulling the shot. If you’re using the machine’s one-touch features, it’ll still do the milk and coffee separately.

This machine has a lot more in terms of ability to tweak things on the coffee side of things than most of the other Gaggia machines, in fact at this kind of price (which is still relatively inexpensive as far as one touch bean to cup machines go) it’s probably the most customisable one touch coffee machine I’ve come across. 

You have 15 grind settings, 3 taste settings, which prompts a tweak to the pre-infusion time. 5 strength settings, brew temp control, and a flow rate knob which enables you to slow the flow rate down for espresso, and speed it up for longer coffees.

Gaggia Accademia One Touch.

Gaggia Accademia One Touch.

Check Price – Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 1.6 Litre Water Tank
  • Dual Boilers
  • Top filling water tank for uninterrupted shots
  • 300g Bean Hopper Capacity
  • Carafe milk frother
  • Manual steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • One Touch Cappuccino
  • One Touch Latte Macchiato
  • Self cleaning milk carafe
  • 15 grind settings
  • 3 strength settings
  • 3 taste settings – delicate, balanced, full-bodied
  • 3 brew temperature settings
  • 3 Froth density settings
  • Flow rate knob
  • Dimensions: 28.2cm wide x 42.8cm deep x 38.5cm tall.
  • Double shot capability
  • Bypass chute for pre-ground coffee
  • Maximum Cup Height: 16.5 cm
  • Ability to program descale frequency based on water hardness
  • Adjustable standby time
  • Maximum shots before emptying grinds container: 16

My Observations:

The second of the two flagship one touch coffee machines from Gaggia, and the most expensive in the UK (this differs in other countries for some reason) the Accademia one touch is very similar to the Babila, they look similar, and most of the features are the sam. 

These are the main differences between the Gaggia Babilia Vs Gaggia Accademia:

  • Water tank just a tad bigger on the Accademia at 1.6L vs 1.5L on the Babila
  • 3 coffee strength settings on the Accademia vs 5 on the Babila
  • 3 froth density levels on the Accademia – the only Gaggia coffee machine I’m aware of with adjustable froth density.
  • The Accademia doesn’t have the special drinks button that the Babila has
  • The Accademia is slightly bigger: 3.7cm wider, 0.8cm deeper, 2.5cm taller

Best Gaggia home barista coffee machines

There’s only one Gaggia coffee machine that I believe qualifies as a “home barista” espresso machine, and that’s the Gaggia Classic Pro. 

Gaggia Classic Pro.

Gaggia Classic Pro.

Check Price - Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 2.1 Litre Water Tank
  • Pro steam wand
  • Single Aluminium boiler 80ml
  • Chromed brass brew group
  • Stainless steel body
  • Dimensions: 23cm wide x 24cm deep x 38cm tall
  • Comes with both standard baskets and pressurised baskets
  • Steam and shot buttons are rocker switches
  • 3 way solenoid valve
  • Maximum Cup Height: 8.5 cm

My Observations:

Released just over thirty years ago, at the time of writing, the classic has been the first home barista espresso machine for huge numbers of home baristas all over the world.

Although there was a bit of controversy when Philips bought the company that owned Gaggia in 2009, which saw the classic change away from the old classic people knew and loved, this was addressed with the latest version of the classic.

The Gaggia Classic Pro, which is very close to the original internally (most importantly, with the inclusion of the 3 way solenoid valve) and features a pro steam wand.

While there’s quite a lot of competition for the classic at this kind of price (about £430) including the Sage Bambino plus, there’s really nothing else quite like the classic, not at this kind of price point. The closest is probably the Rancilio Silvia E, but at about a hundred pounds more, it’s not quite a fair comparison.

Like the Rancilio Silvia, and unlike many other entry level home barista espresso machines, the classic is more of an “old school” espresso machine which can be maintained and fixed over the years, by anyone with a bit of DIY competence, so this is a fairly low-cost machine which could still be going strong in 20 years or more! My classic at the time of writing is over 18 years old, and it’s fine! 

Gaggia Direct will service your Classic for you, by the way. I had my classic serviced by them not so long ago, it just needed a bit of TLC and ongoing maintenance, a new seal, a new valve etc., and they had it back to me within about a week.

For more on the  Gaggia Classic Pro see:

Gaggia Classic Pro Review

Best Gaggia domestic espresso machines

As discussed at the beginning of this post, when I talk about domestic espresso machines, I’m talking about traditional (usually semi auto, or “pump” machines) espresso machines which are made to be cheaper, and easier to use straight out of the box without developing barista skills.

Gran Gaggia - Best Cheap Espresso Machines

Gran Gaggia - Best Cheap Espresso Machines

Check Price - Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 1 Litre Water Tank
  • Panarello steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • Dimensions: 20cm wide x 26.5cm deep x 26.5cm tall
  • Single stainless steel boiler
  • Pressurised portafilter
  • Compatible with ESE coffee pods
  • Maximum Cup Height: 7.5 cm

My Observations:

This is a very low cost domestic espresso machine from Gaggia, and it’s basically what I would expect for this kind of money. 

If you just want to get a coffee machine out of the box and start making espresso-based coffees, you’re not fussed about achieving perfection, and you don’t see yourself as a home barista, then something like the Gran Gaggia is a very affordable option. 

I’ve used it, and it’s fine for the money. It does have some competition, machines like the Swan Retro (which is a machine that sells under various different brand names) are a bit cheaper, and do a similar job.

The one thing that would possibly lead me to spend a little bit more on the Gaggia if I’m honest, is simply that I know that Gaggia Direct supply and service them, so you can get good old fashioned support on the phone or online if you need it. 

See my video below on the Gran Gaggia, and apologies in advance for the audio, this is one of my earlier videos, I’ve dramatically improved the quality of my videos more recently.

There are various versions of the Gran Gaggia, which feature the same machine internally, which only differ when it comes to aesthetics, metal vs plastic etc., click here to see all of the options. 

Gaggia Viva Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Viva Coffee Machine.

Check Price - Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 1 Litre Water Tank
  • Panarello steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • Dimensions: 20cm wide x 26.5cm deep x 29.7cm tall
  • Single stainless steel boiler
  • Pressurised portafilter
  • Compatible with ESE coffee pods
  • Maximum Cup Height: 7.5 cm

My Observations:

Essentially, this is a newer version of the Gran Gaggia range, with very similar features.

The main difference between them, other than being available in a bigger range of styles and colours, is that instead of having an espresso button and steam button, they simply have one dial with which you toggle in between steam and espresso.

Gaggia Carezza Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Carezza Coffee Machine.

Check Price - Gaggia Direct

Features.

  • 1.4 Litre Water Tank – front loading
  • Water tank will take a Brita filter
  • Panarello steam wand
  • Steam wand doubles as hot water spout
  • Dimensions: 28.5cm wide x 30cm deep x 32cm tall
  • Priming button
  • Thermoblock boiler
  • Pressurised portafilter
  • Compatible with ESE coffee pods
  • Maximum Cup Height: 10 cm

My Observations:

The Carezza is quite an interesting espresso machine, being quite a bit different from all of the other domestic espresso machines from Gaggia.

The main differences, as well as looks, are the thermoblock boiler and the font loading water tank. 

While most other domestic espresso machines from other manufacturers under around £200 tend to have thermoblock boilers, all of the other espresso machines from Gaggia other than their bean to cup machines, have a small brew boiler.

The difference between the two if you weren’t familiar with the terms, is that thermoblock boilers are on-demand water heaters which heat the water as it pulses through the block. Think combi boiler vs tank fed boiler for central heating.

So the two Caraezza machines both have a thermoblock, boiler, and they both have a front loading water tank too, which is what you’d usually expect from the Gaggia bean to cup machines, but I wouldn’t usually expect to find on traditional espresso machines. 

Gaggia Carezza Deluxe Coffee Machine.

Gaggia Carezza Deluxe Coffee Machine.Check Price - Gaggia Direct

Features.

(Those which differ from the base level version above in bold) 

  • Thermometre

My Observations:

This was the original version of the Carezza, and features a thermometer, and did previously also feature a heavier weight portafilter. They released the slightly cheaper Carezza style more recently, without the thermometre and with a lighter weight portafilter. Since then, they changed the portafilter on the Deluxe to be the same as the style, so really the only difference between these two machines is the thermometre.

Best Gaggia coffee machines – conclusion

To conclude, Gaggia produce quite a range of machines, as you know now from reading this post – and hopefully you’ll also now have a much better idea of which Gaggia coffee machine is right for you, or at least which type of coffee machine would be the best match for you, which is a start at least. 

You’ll notice that when it comes to home coffee machines, Gaggia only make one home barista machine, the Gaggia Classic Pro, they do produce a number of commercial machines, but these are much bigger and more expensive, intended for use in coffee shops and restaurants etc., click here to see commercial coffee machines from Gaggia.

Finally, to answer a few commonly asked questions: 

Which Gaggia coffee machine is best?

Best is a subjective word, there is no “best” as such, only best for you – so the first thing to ascertain is what kind of machine should you be going for? Semi auto bean to cup with a milk frother, fully automatic one-touch bean to cup machine, home barista espresso machine or domestic espresso machine? Once you’ve decided on the type of coffee machine, that narrows your choice down in terms of which may be the best Gaggia coffee machine for you if you’ve decided Gaggia is the brand you want to invest in.

Where to buy Gaggia coffee machines?

In the UK, I recommend Gaggia Direct, in Elland near Halifax. As I mentioned earlier, these folk were Gaggia UK until Philips bought the company and closed the business here, at which point the former MD of Gaggia UK set up Gaggia Direct (Caffe Shop Ltd) to become the sole UK distributor for Gaggia Milan.

The history these guys have, and more importantly the product knowledge, allows them to provide great customer support. If you like to be able to pick up the phone and be speaking to someone straight away who knows what they’re talking about, or to just click a link and set up a zoom meeting to discuss your query or problem, you’ll like Gaggia Direct.

There are other sources of Gaggia coffee machines, but if you’re buying elsewhere, just make double sure that you are actually buying UK stock, as most of the other websites listing Gaggia machines are sending stock direct from Italy or other parts of Europe, which can create a number of problems including, but not limited to, not having a UK warranty.

Where are Gaggia coffee machines made?

All of the Gaggia bean to cup coffee machines, plus the Gaggia Classic and both of the Gaggia Carezza coffee machines are manufactured in Bologna, Northern Italy. The Gaggia Viva range and Gran Gaggia range are made in China.

Gaggia Vs DeLonghi, who make the best coffee machines?

Gaggia and DeLonghi are among the biggest names in coffee machines at the time of writing, and it’s fair to say that both have become trusted brand names. It’s incredibly difficult to make a sweeping statement about which company make the best coffee machines, both Gaggia and DeLonghi have a great reputation when it comes to their coffee machines.

It’s fair to say that Gaggia purely make coffee machines, and that they have a much longer history in coffee. While Gaggia invented modern espresso, DeLonghi started out as a manufacturer of portable heaters and air conditioners, and then moved into a wide range of household appliances, coffee machines being just one of their areas of expertise, and their first coffee machine was released in 1990. 

But regardless of this history, both companies are currently extremely successful with their coffee machines, and both have a large range – so to try to determine which is best we’d have to do this on a machine by machine basis.

Also See:

Best DeLonghi Cofee Machines

Life is like a box of chocolates, so join my Brew Time list, subscribe to my YouTube Channel, become an accredited coffee botherer (Patreon supporter), try my coffee at The Coffeeworks (use discount code coffeebotherers), follow me on Twitter & Instagram, follow the coffeeblog FaceBook page, and that’s all I have to say about that. 

Spread the love

This article firstly appeared at Coffee Blog – The UK Specialty Coffee Blog – For Lovers of REAL Coffee!

%d bloggers like this: